1at time doing new wheel bearings

Discussion in '1993 - 1997 Ford Ranger' started by Timbootz, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. Timbootz

    Timbootz New Member

    Ok so did my front brakes today and it was my first time doing my own wheel bearings. Now I watched a bunch of YouTube videos and got cracking. My question is how long should I drive on them before checking they are not to tight or to loose.

    I followed the torgue info I found here of first torguing them to 30ft/lbs while rotating them in the opposite direction, then backing off a half turn, re torguing them to 21 ft/lbs, backing off a half a turn and then finger tightnening. More like snuggling the nut up against the washer. (I don't own an in/lb tourge wrench and 17-20 inch/lbs wound be hard to get acurate anyway.
    Can I adjust the bearings with the wheel on or does it need to come off to take the load off the bearings?
     
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  3. mhoward

    mhoward Member

    I have never used a torque wrench to preload wheel bearings. Your procedure works fine and is the same as mine, only I don't use the torque wrench. Once they are set, you don't HAVE to go back and recheck them later... only if you want to. You can do it with the wheel on (actually, I prefer it that way).
     
  4. OP
    Timbootz

    Timbootz New Member

    I'm a guy, If I have the tools I will use them..lol...

    Yeah between here and chiltons manual i read about the torquing procedure to seat the bearings. the work is easy enough, i'm not a stranger to bearings, it is just that last little bit of 'feel' if you know what I mean...
     
  5. mhoward

    mhoward Member

    @Timbootz: I know what you mean. I do own a torque wrench, just never use it for the wheel bearings. I use a pair of straight jaw channel locks. I know what you mean about the "feel"... that is why I don't use the torque wrench. My dad (lifetime auto mechanic) taught me how to repack the bearings properly and seat them in. There's probably a better way, but hell, never had one come back on me, so what I do must work, right? :)
     
  6. OP
    Timbootz

    Timbootz New Member

    Any particular sounds or driving I should listen for to indicate if they are 2 tight or to loose?
     
  7. mhoward

    mhoward Member

    A bad wheel bearing will normally make a roaring noise. A loose wheel bearing most times will not make ANY noise. Don't recall ever dealing with a wheel bearing that was too tight...
     
  8. OP
    Timbootz

    Timbootz New Member

    Yeah not making a roaring noise at all. I wonder if it juat the new pass settling in. Amazes me that the hole thing is held together buy 1 loose(ish) 27mm nut and a cotter pin. I don't want to loose a wheel.
    It seems like to move the but enough for the next cotter pin position would make it to tight..
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2017
  9. DeanMk

    DeanMk Member

    Tim,

    Better to show you than try to explain on a forum.
    Let's make plans to get together soon and I will show you, in person, how you're supposed to adjust the front wheel bearings.
    ...and it's the same for any car.
    PM or email me.


    Dean
     
  10. OP
    Timbootz

    Timbootz New Member

    Might have to take you up on that soonish. I am having a clicking coming from my front end, not sure if it is from the bearings, or I it could P issiably be my CV joints. I k ow I need to replace my shocks, but I'm sure that isn't the problem as it is a rhythmic sound at slow speeds mainly.
     

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